Using Agile View in ioscan

With HP-UX 11.31 comes “agile” disk naming. Tips for using agile view in ioscan:

The -N flag turns on agile view

Before:

# ioscan -fnC disk | head -n 15
Class     I  H/W Path     Driver S/W State   H/W Type     Description
=====================================================================
disk      1  0/1/1/0.0.0.0.0                     sdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                         /dev/dsk/c3t0d0     /dev/dsk/c3t0d0s2   /dev/rdsk/c3t0d0    /dev/rdsk/c3t0d0s2
                         /dev/dsk/c3t0d0s1   /dev/dsk/c3t0d0s3   /dev/rdsk/c3t0d0s1  /dev/rdsk/c3t0d0s3
disk      2  0/1/1/0.0.0.1.0                     sdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                         /dev/dsk/c3t1d0     /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s2   /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0    /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0s2
                         /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s1   /dev/dsk/c3t1d0s3   /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0s1  /dev/rdsk/c3t1d0s3
disk      3  0/1/1/0.0.0.2.0                     sdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                         /dev/dsk/c3t2d0     /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s2   /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0    /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s2
                         /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s1   /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s3   /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s1  /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s3
disk     10  0/2/0/0/0/0/4/0/0/0.4.41.0.0.0.0    sdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      OPEN-V
                         /dev/dsk/c6t0d0   /dev/rdsk/c6t0d0
disk     11  0/2/0/0/0/0/4/0/0/0.4.41.0.0.0.1    sdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      OPEN-V
                         /dev/dsk/c6t0d1   /dev/rdsk/c6t0d1

After:

# ioscan -fnNC disk | head -n 15
Class     I  H/W Path  Driver S/W State   H/W Type     Description
===================================================================
disk      5  64000/0xfa00/0x0   esdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                      /dev/disk/disk5      /dev/disk/disk5_p2   /dev/rdisk/disk5     /dev/rdisk/disk5_p2
                      /dev/disk/disk5_p1   /dev/disk/disk5_p3   /dev/rdisk/disk5_p1  /dev/rdisk/disk5_p3
disk      6  64000/0xfa00/0x1   esdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                      /dev/disk/disk6      /dev/disk/disk6_p2   /dev/rdisk/disk6     /dev/rdisk/disk6_p2
                      /dev/disk/disk6_p1   /dev/disk/disk6_p3   /dev/rdisk/disk6_p1  /dev/rdisk/disk6_p3
disk      7  64000/0xfa00/0x2   esdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      EH0146FARWD
                      /dev/disk/disk7      /dev/disk/disk7_p2   /dev/rdisk/disk7     /dev/rdisk/disk7_p2
                      /dev/disk/disk7_p1   /dev/disk/disk7_p3   /dev/rdisk/disk7_p1  /dev/rdisk/disk7_p3
disk      9  64000/0xfa00/0x4   esdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       Optiarc DVD RW AD-5590A
                      /dev/disk/disk9   /dev/rdisk/disk9
disk     68  64000/0xfa00/0xe   esdisk   CLAIMED     DEVICE       HP      OPEN-V
                      /dev/disk/disk68   /dev/rdisk/disk68

Use -m dsf to translate between old-school and agile device special files

Old to new:

# ioscan -m dsf /dev/dsk/c6t0d1
Persistent DSF           Legacy DSF(s)
========================================
/dev/disk/disk69         /dev/dsk/c6t0d1

New to old (a great way to list multiple paths!):

# ioscan -m dsf /dev/disk/disk69
Persistent DSF           Legacy DSF(s)
========================================
/dev/disk/disk69         /dev/dsk/c6t0d1
                         /dev/dsk/c10t0d1

Turn off the monitor in command line mode (runlevel 3) in RHEL

In runlevel 3, RHEL (most Linuxes, probably) only blanks the monitor after so much inactivity, it doesn’t tell the monitor to actually turn off. This has annoyed me for years, but I just found a command to turn off and on the monitor:

# /usr/sbin/vbetool dpms [off|on]

I’ve haven’t rigged it to be triggered by console activity yet, but at least I can manually turn off and on the monitor through software now.